Seed Starting 101: Planting Peas

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Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead
Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead
Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead #plantingpeas #seedstarting101 #gardeningtipsHow to successfully plant peas for a successful harvest to fill your freezer with! All my tips and tricks for a great big harvest of peas! ~The Reid Homestead #peas #plantingpeas #growingpeas #vegetablegardening #howtogrowpeas #howtoplantpeas #gardeningtipsTips and tricks for successfully planting peas! Growing peas in your own garden is easy! ~The Reid Homestead #peas #plantingpeas #growingpeas #peasinthegarden #vegetablegardening #gardeningtips

Spring Gardening Begins with Peas

Happy Spring! Soon it will be the first day of spring…..have you got your peas planted yet? Planting peas is usually my first act of getting the garden going for the year. It is the first thing that gets planted outside in the garden in the new year, along with fava beans. Also known as broad beans. Fava beans are simple, just stick them in the ground, down about an 1″ or 2″, and you are good to go. Peas are a little more tricky, so in this article I will share my tips for planting peas successfully.

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Not a Fan of Peas?

Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead
My pea crop from a previous year

If you or your family are not a fan of peas, have you ever tried them fresh from the garden? Eating raw peas fresh from the garden is like eating candy. They are so sweet and crisp and yummy! Nothing like store bought canned peas which in my opinion are just gross.

Freezing peas from the garden are almost as good as fresh. See my article on freezing beans, I use the exact same method for freezing peas. After shelling them of course! Than blanch and follow the same exact procedure. Although you can preserve peas by canning them, I find them unappealing preserved that way. So give them another try and grow them yourself and you will see.

Types of Peas

There are three different types of peas, shelling peas, snap peas and snow peas. Shelling peas are the ones you shell, and harvest the round green peas from inside the shell. I prefer the Green Arrow variety, because it produces a lot of peas per shell and they are super sweet and crisp. It takes a lot of time to shell each pea by hand, so I would rather get a lot of peas from a shell, than just a few.

Snap peas are the thick pea pod that you eat raw as a whole, pod and all. These make a great snack served with hummus or ranch dressing to dip with. My preferred variety is the Cascadia Sugar Snap. Than there are snow peas, which are the very flat variety that you will often see in stir fry’s. This one you also eat the whole pod and all. I don’t typically grow these, because I like the other two types better. I find that the snow peas get a bit slimy if frozen, so I will just use snap peas in place of snow peas.

When to Plant Peas

Here in the Pacific Northwest, I usually target President’s Day, or mid February, as the day to look and see if the weather is cooperating enough to plant. This year it was way to wet that early, and I had to wait until the 2nd week of March. If you plant them, and get very wet cold weather, the seeds will rot.

That is what happened last year. I planted 2 separate batches last year, that both rotted. It wasn’t until the end of March, that my 3rd batch took. So keep your eye on the weather to help you determine if there is a good window of opportunity. Hopefully we are good to go and the seeds I just planted will germinate and start growing before we get another really wet system roll in.

Temperatures Needed for Peas to Germinate

Peas don’t mind the cold, but they won’t germinate if it’s freezing out. In order for them to germinate quickly, you want a good window of temps in the mid 50’s or higher. But they don’t like the heat, which is why they really are an early spring or fall crop.

If it gets too hot, they wither up and die. So not only do you want a dry window, but you want to look for a warm spell to go with it. Luckily I live in a moderate climate, and we often see short periods this warm or warmer, starting in February. I am writing this on March 20th, and last week we broke records here in the low 70’s!

Tips for Quick Germination of Peas

Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead
Pea seeds that were soaked, and then sprinkled with inoculant an ready to plant

Besides ideal weather, there are a couple of tricks to get your peas to germinate quickly. First, soak your peas before planting. Either overnight or even for a couple of hours. This really speeds up their germination time.

Second, after soaking the peas, pour off the water and mix in some inoculant. Inoculant is a nitrogen fixing bacteria. Adding inoculant helps the peas (or any legumes it is used with) to form more nitrogen fixing nodules, which helps them grow faster and stronger. It also allows them to put more nitrogen back into the soil, which peas and legumes are so well know for.

Planting Peas

Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead
Planting peas in a raised wide row

After they have soaked and you have mixed in your inoculant, it is time to plant them. I tend to plant in wide raised rows. So I use a pencil or a chopstick, and poke a whole in the ground around 1-1/2″ deep, than drop in a pea. I space them about ever 2-3″ across the entire wide row.

After all the peas are dropped in the holes, I just use my hand to smooth over dirt, covering the peas. Than water well. Peas generally don’t like a lot of fertilizer, so I don’t bother with anything extra than mixing in good compost before planting. For a continual harvest, plant another batch every two weeks.

Don’t forget to Mulch!

Before you walk away from them, don’t forget to mulch them! I am currently transitioning my veggie garden from raised wide rows, to a Back to Eden garden. So I currently will mulch my peas with straw.

The straw prevents weeds from germinating, and helps keep the soil from drying out, which means less watering. It’s also a good idea to provide something for the peas to climb on. I prefer to use this woven netting strung between two T-posts.

 

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Planting Peas - Part of my Seed Starting 101 Series. Follow along as I share my tips and tricks on planting peas for a successful mega harvest! The Reid Homestead

2 COMMENTS

  1. Christine Norman | 26th Mar 18

    I love this blog! Such great ideas. I’ll not a great planter and don’t have a lot of free time but this seems so easy. Thanks for the tips. I’m going to try milk jugs and peas first.

    • Tamara | 26th Mar 18

      Hi Christine! Glad you stopped by! Let me know if you have any questions! I love to help new gardeners and am always happy to help! 🙂

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