Seed Starting 101- How to Plant Onion Seed Indoors in Winter

Starting Onion Seed in January January is the month my fingers get itching to plant onion seed. Luckily there are a few things you can plant by seed as early as January here in the PNW, even earlier in milder parts. In this post, I will teach you how I plant onion seed indoors. It is usually the first thing I plant in the dead of winter. Other things that may be started this month by seed are celery, artichoke, asparagus and hot peppers. Different Methods for Sowing Seeds I sow most of my seeds using two methods, Winter Sowing and also indoors using your standard seed starting Equipment. Please see these two article for more information on both methods: Seed Starting 101: Winter Sowing in which I share how I use milk jugs outdoors as mini greenhouses to start seed and my post about Seed Starting Equipment lists more detail about equipment needed to start your seeds indoors. It also covers what type of soil I use for starting seeds. Choosing Which Onion Varieties to Plant I chose several varieties of onion seed to plant, with my primary focus being on onions that are excellent keeping onions or also called storage onions. These types of onions will last in storage all through winter after harvesting and curing them. When trying to grow most of our own produce for the year, it is essential to look at varieties of food that keep well. These type of onions are the yellow ones you would buy in the grocery store. For this reason, I choose not to start my onions by onion sets. Often onion sets will bolt very early, and there are usually not many varieties to choose from when using onion sets. You can plant any varieties of onions including…

Tamara


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Seed Starting 101 Series: Essential Seed Starting Equipment

Seed Starting 101: Essential Seed Starting Equipment Thank you for following along with me on my Seed Starting 101 series. Today we will be going over the essential seed starting equipment that is needed for you to successfully plant your seed indoors. Before we get going, a couple thoughts I want to share. First, please remember as we go along, that I grow a LOT of stuff. My goals are to grow most of the fruits and veggies that we eat. I also grow extra seed starts to sell. So please don’t be overwhelmed by my set up. You can start with one tray of seeds, or 5 or 10, or more. That is all up to you. Please also think about the space you have to dedicate to seed starting before you begin. It can easily take an entire room, or not. But you have to plan for where it is going to go. If you have cats, or inquisitive dogs, you may want to put your seed starting project in a room with a door so you can keep them out. It is horrible to have put in all the time and effort and then come find your cat has dug up your baby plants, or your dog has knocked a tray over. Another completely different way to start seeds that you might want to read about is my Seed Starting 101: Winter Sowing article. It is an inexpensive way to start seeds outdoors in the dead of winter, using milk jugs as mini-greenhouses. Also, another must read article shares how I store my seeds here: How to Keep Your Seed Stash Organized OK. Here we go. Plant trays: These plant trays are the first essential thing you need. Baby plants to not like to…

Tamara


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Seed Starting 101: Series Launch

Seed Starting 101: What to Grow Welcome to the new year and my new Seed Starting 101 guide! The most exciting thing to me after the holidays, is getting ready for starting my seeds. Here in this series, Seed Starting 101, I will document the step by step the process I use, and what to plant and when to plant it. First, you need to start with a garden plan. There are many online tools to help you with this, or if you are like me, just sketch it out with pen and paper. First and foremost, grow what your family will eat. If they hate Brussel sprouts, then don’t grow them. Really think about the food you currently eat. Do you eat pasta with red sauce once a week, once a month? Pizza sauce? Salsa? I think about all of these as well as fresh eating, to determine how many tomatoes to grow. Basically I grow as many as I possibly can because I love tomatoes in all forms, and can up any that we don’t eat fresh, in some way shape or form. If you are new to preserving food, the easiest way is in the freezer. Or dehydrating. Do you buy frozen veggies? Than grow them and freeze your own! And don’t forget to grow some extras for your friends or your family. I sell extra starts, so I can make a little extra money to cover my costs. Seed Starting 101: Where to Acquire Seed Ideally, save most of your own seed from year to year. As the plants adapt to your soil and growing conditions, they become stronger plants, so that is the absolute best seed you can use. But if you haven’t saved your own seed…

Tamara


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